Awesome products avoid WTF moments for users

My teammate @sregmi rightfully pointed out that awesomeness of a product is inversely proportional to the number of WTF moments in its customer experience. WTF moments can be characterized simply as blunders – those moments when your user’s first natural reaction is WTF, usually accompanied with a bad taste and often followed by bad-mouthing about your product. Besides avoiding such blunders, awesome products handle every error condition elegantly :

  1. Acknowledge that an error has occurred
    (deliver the bad news yourself and reassure the user that you’ll fix it)
  2. Tell the user how she got there
    (address the obvious curiosity of every user : “What did I do?”)
  3. Show the user how to get out of here
    (answer the likely question: “Now what?”)

404 pages aren’t necessarily blunders, but many websites make a sincere attempt to address 404s. Fandango’s 404 page handles it elegantly –

Screen Shot 2013-05-23 at 12.05.10 AMSurprisingly, some of the better designed products also end up serving WTF moments:

  • You made a reservation on OpenTable. You reach the restaurant to find out that the restaurant is closed.
  • You keep waiting for UberX on the curb and it never shows up.
  • You are in middle of an important phone call and iPhone/AT&T drops the call.

What are your product’s WTF moments?

-Kintan

Awesome products address the most common curiosity of users

Awesome products raise the bar of customer experience by addressing the most common curiosities of their users. Not to be confused with the minimum viable product, the most common curiosity indicates the primary need of majority of your users when they are interacting with your product. X-RayForMovies

While designing new customer experiences, I’ve found it useful to observe human behavior and identify the most common curiosities of users. For instance, one of our recent products – X-Ray for Video on Kindle Fire HD – solves a common curiosity of almost all movie watchers – “Who’s that actor and where else have I seen him?”. Shazam raises the bar when it comes to music by addressing the most common curiosity – “What’s that song and who sang it?”.

Photo May 06, 10 47 24 PM

A few utility apps have mastered the art of addressing their users’ common curiosities. Google Maps is my favorite among them. Most users are curious to find out how far is a particular place from where they are and how long will it take them to get there. Google Maps addresses them by automatically showing distance and time in search results.

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When a product solves a universally applicable need, it inherently raises the customer experience. It is equally important to reduce friction in the interaction, so users do more of it. X-Ray comes up by just tapping the screen while watching a video, Shazam identifies a track by just tapping the screen to tag it and Google Maps automatically shows distance and time.

What is the most common curiosity of your users?

-Kintan

 

How to delight users?

Awesome products are useful, usable and delightful (in that order). While delight is the third order bit, it often ends up being the hardest to pull off. Apple is a master of  delight – from storefronts that mimic a sleeping person at night to tens of apps with a heightened sense of realism (such as Notes, PhotoBooth, Compass, Calculator and more). As a purveyor of delight, I first wrote about delightful products in 2010, but this post attempts to add some science to the art of creating delight.

Delight is best delivered subtly. Subtlety can be achieved with –

  • a witty, but honest use of words,
  • an uncanny attention to detail,
  • anticipation of user’s desires and
  • an element of surprise.

Witty words: Words can delight users, if used aptly. Airbnb’s iPhone app uses words to make their first use experience delightful. For instance, if a user hasn’t booked any trips, the app subtly nudges the user – “Search for that city you’ve always wanted to visit!” instead of showing an empty screen with an ad. I wrote about the power of words in the last post.

AirBnB

Attention to detail: Apple refers to this attention to detail as a “heightened sense of realism” in the official design guidelines for iOS apps. One of my favorite apps – ness (instant restaurant recommendations) changes the background with a mouth-watering dish that represents the search term. For instance, searching for Indian food changes the background to a dish of Channa Masala or Chicken Tikka. Such attention to detail converts a user into a fan by offering unforgettable experience.

Ness Ness

Anticipating user’s desires: While it may sound tricky, anticipating user’s desires can be simplified by focusing on user’s primary intent on a particular screen. Google is the master of anticipating user’s intents – from “I’m feeling lucky” button since the very beginning to  suggestion search. Another app that skillfully anticipates user’s desires is Songza. It takes simple cues such as time of day, day of week, day of year, etc. to deliver delightful experiences. It eliminates the need for mental math for users by recommending playlists based on activities and moods suitable for a given time.

Songza

Element of surprise: Timing is critical, when it comes to delivering delight. Twitter Music’s iPhone app masterfully surprises the user at the least expected instance. For instance, when you long press the app icon to rearrange them on your screen, the wiggling icon creates an illusion of a throbbing boom-box speaker. TwitterMusic

Further, the app uses a clever animation when a user refreshes a page – nine dots first form an arrow and then a grid with disco lights. Users don’t expect these subtle animations, but get delighted by the surprise.

TwitterMusic1 TwitterMusic2

Such delights don’t make a product more useful or usable, however they make useful products more fun, sticky and awesome. Let’s build delightful products!

-Kintan

Awesome products connect with users through words

In addition to being useful, usable and delightful, great products converse with their users to form a interesting bond. Language, vocabulary and tone of this conversation informs the interestingness of this bond. Awesome product creators are also master story tellers and they tell powerful stories through their products. I’ve often felt connected to the stories of my favorite products and have curiously dived deeper to study the words used to tell these stories.

These ten brands use powerful and intriguing words in their copy.

  1. Google: I’m feeling lucky
    Google
  2. Pinterest : A few (million) of your favorite things
    Pinterest
  3. Path : Share life with the ones you love
    Path
  4. Macbook Air: Powerful enough to carry you through the day. With so little to
    actually carry.
    MacbookAir1
  5. Spotify: Soundtrack your life
    Spotify
  6. Chipotle: There’s a burrito in your iphone.
    Chipotle
  7. Nike Fuelband: Life is a sport. Make it count.
    Nike FuelBand
  8. Fab: Smile, you’re designed to.
    Fab
  9. Cupidtino: *pegged to the price of a venti mocha lite in Cupertino Starbucks.
    Cupidtino
  10. TrunkClub: Become the best-dressed guy in the room
    Trunk Club

What brands use words that stir your soul?

-Kintan